Friday, March 10, 2017

Notes on A Pattern - Vogue 1314 and McCall 7542 Getting the Most Out of Your Patterns



Happy Friday everyone!

Are you getting the most out of your patterns?  Do you only use a pattern once, then discard it? Do you buy multiple copies of the same one?  How big is your pattern collection?



I've been collecting patterns for over three decades.  In the early years, I only bought them when I was planning to make something and was always happy to take advantage of an occasional sale.  As my skills improved and sales came more frequently, the collection started growing exponentially.  Now, I have amassed over 600 patterns including three years of Burda World of Style Magazines.  Sometimes, I buy multiple copies for client/student use or just because.  The only patterns I've ever discarded were in a give-away event or I tossed them because they were poorly drafted.  During my long practice of learning to become a good sewist, I learned to mix and match pattern pieces.  This was out of necessity and lack of drafting skills.  These days I'm becoming very selective in what I buy to help slow down the growth my collection.

More and more I'm returning to my old practice of mixing and matching pattern pieces.  It is cost effective and it saves time.   I've used Vogue 1314 several times and consider it a TNT.  It is simple.  I use the front lining, back lining, neckband, and sleeve.  It's a t-shirt dress!

Sleeves are a really big thing these days, and so pattern companies are following the trend as well.  McCall 7542 is showing up all across social media.  At first sight, I knew I would buy a copy.


It's available in sizes 6 to 22 with cup size A/B, C, and D.  The base of the top is simple with four different sleeves: tulip, trumpet, pleated, and bubble.  Great potential to make multiple tops and dresses.

So my first use of M7542 was with V1314 to create a tulip sleeve knit dress shown above. The sleeve was a perfect fit.  I'm planning to try all of the sleeves, either in a dress or top.

Consider mixing and matching patterns to create your own unique style.

Happy Sewing!

Cennetta




11 comments:

  1. Very attractive dress! A great job of mixing pieces. I thought this was called "frankinpattern" somewhere I read.

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  2. I am definitely working on using patterns more frequently than once. I work with a crafty lady in her 80s who is always telling me that she used patterns over and over (roughly a TNT) depending on what she wanted, and that she could sew just about anything, and did. I like the tips you gave too.

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  3. I use my patterns over and over. I have learned to mix pattern pieces too. I love your red dress and the sleeves. It is amazing how we can change a simple look by adding different sleeve options to a dress or top.

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  4. Lovely dress! I haven't gotten to the point of mixing patterns yet, but I really like the versatility it offers.

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    1. Chris, thanks. Try it; you won't be disappointed.

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  5. The sleeves on this dress are great! I agree with you. Mixing and matching is a great strategy. Plus it's a huge time saver. If you already have a great fit in a pattern, it's a hop, skip, and a jump to add a different sleeve or neckline vs. cutting out/fitting an entirely new pattern.

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  6. Pretty dress. Those sleeves immediately grabbed my attention. I love the longer fuller sleeve and more than that, a return to sleeves. So tired of sleeveless.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Bunny. I'm happy about the focus on sleeves too.

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